Can’t Lift Arm Above Shoulder Without Pain? (Best Exercises)

Do you have pain when you reach your arm above the shoulder height?

cant lift arm above shoulder without pain

This blog post covers 10 reasons why you can’t lift your arm up (… and the best exercises to fix this problem!)


10 Reasons why you can’t lift your arm:

1. Tight Shoulder Muscles
2. Rotator Cuff Injury
3. Sub-Acromial Bursitis
4. Lack of External Rotation
5. Limited Upward Rotation of Scapula
6. Anterior Tilt of Scapula
7. Hunchback Posture
8. Pinched Nerve in Neck
9. Frozen Shoulder
10. Other Issues

Note: If you are like most of the other people with this problem, it is very likely that you will need to address more than one of the issues as mentioned above!


1. Tight Shoulder Muscles

Tightness in any of the following shoulder muscles may prevent the arm from raising above the shoulder/head height:

  • Latissimus Dorsi
  • Teres Major/Minor
  • Pectoralis Major/Minor
  • Subscapularis
  • Coracobrachialis
  • Long Head of Triceps
  • Posterior Deltoid

These muscles tend to pull (Adduct) and/or rotate (Internally Rotate) the arm towards the body.

arm pit muscles

(… Think of these muscles as the ones responsible for squashing your inner arm into the arm pit.)

a) What makes these muscles tight?

In my opinion – One of the main reasons as to why these muscles (which are located in the arm pit region) tend to get tight is due to the natural resting position of the arm.

Think about your arm position: If you are like most people, your arms will be by your side throughout the whole day.

Over time – This position can predispose these muscles to getting tight.

Additionally, this effect is amplified if the inner portion of the upper arm is habitually squeezed towards the sides of the torso. (… This is a common protective behavior if there is pain present in the shoulder!)

b) How to address the tight muscles:

Here are 3 simple (but effective) ways to loosen up the tight muscles in the shoulder:

A. Releases

Releasing (massaging) the tight shoulder muscles can help reduce the amount of tension in the muscle.

a) Side Lie Position

Target Areas:

target area for releases
  • Latissimus Dorsi
  • Teres Minor/Major
  • Long Head of Triceps
  • Posterior Deltoid
releases to help lift arm

Instructions:

  • Identify the exact location of the tight muscles. (See Target Areas)
  • Lie down on your side.
  • Place this region on top of a massage ball or foam roller.
  • Apply an appropriate amount of your body weight on top of the massage ball/foam roller.
  • Keep your body completely relaxed.
  • Make sure to cover each target area.
  • Continue for 1-2 minutes per region.

b) Chest Release

Target Area:

chest release target area

Pectoralis Major/Minor Release

chest release

Instructions:

  • Stand in front of a wall.
  • Identify the exact location of the tight muscles. (See above: Target Area)
  • Place this region on top of a massage ball.
  • Apply an appropriate amount of your body weight on top of the massage ball.
  • Keep your body completely relaxed.
  • Make sure to cover the entire target area.
  • Continue for 1-2 minutes per region.

c) Subscapularis

Target area:

subscapularis region
subscapularis release

Instructions:

  • Sit down in front on a table.
  • Completely relax your arm onto the table.
  • Use the finger tips of the other arm to push into the front surface of the shoulder blade.
  • Focus on areas of increased tightness.
  • Continue for 30 seconds.

Note: Make sure that you are not causing numbness or tingling down the arm as you apply pressure into the arm pit region. (This means you are probably squashing a nerve!)

d) Coracobrachialis

Target Area:

location of coracobrachialis

Instructions:

  • Sit down in front on a table.
  • Completely relax your arm onto the table.
  • Use the finger tips of the other arm to push into the inside of the upper arm.
  • Focus on areas of increased tightness.
  • Continue for 30 seconds.

Note: Make sure that you are not causing numbness or tingling down the arm. (This means you are probably squashing a nerve!)

B. Stretches

For the majority of you reading this blog post, it is not likely that you will have an adequate amount of mobility to place the shoulder in an overhead position to effectively stretch the tight muscles.

If this is the case with you – I recommend focusing on just the Releases for now.

Once your shoulder has reclaimed more movement, you can progress to the following stretch:

a) Shoulder Stretch

stretch to lift arm up

Instructions:

  • Stand in front of an object that you can rest your hand on.
  • Place your hand on top of the object.
  • Take a few steps backwards.
  • Bend your torso forwards.
  • Allow your chest to drop and hips to move backwards.
  • Aim to feel a stretch in the arm pit region.
  • Hold for 30 seconds.

(Note: Make sure that there is absolutely no pinching pain at the top of the shoulder as you perform this stretch! Aim to move your shoulder as far as possible without causing any pain.

C. “De-activation” of tight muscles

The following exercise can help reduce the amount of activity in the tight muscles which are located within the arm pit region.

deactivation shoulder exercise

Instructions:

  • Lie down on your back.
  • Loop a light resistance band around your wrists.
  • Gently pull your hands apart to create a small amount of tension in the band.
  • Think about having a small gap in between your inner arm and arm pit.
  • Slowly raise your arms over your head (or as far as you are able to) without causing any pain in the shoulder.
  • Perform 30 repetitions.

2. Injury to muscles that lift the arm

Injury to any of the following muscles can make it difficult to raise the arm above the shoulder height without pain:

a) Muscles involved with lifting of the arm:

  • Rotator Cuff (namely Supraspinatus)
  • Deltoid
  • Biceps

b) How do I determine if I have injured one of these muscles?

Muscle Test:

rotator cuff injury test

Instructions:

  • Place your arm out to the front to approximately shoulder height.
  • Place your other hand on top of your wrist and apply a downward pressure.
  • Attempt to raise your arm upwards against this resistance.
  • Repeat test with the thumb pointing:
    • Downwards
    • Forwards
    • Upwards

Results: If there is pain and/or weakness in the shoulder whilst performing this test, this suggests that you may have injured the muscles which are responsible for lifting the arm up.

c) What exercises will fix these injured muscles?

Generally speaking – The best way to address an injured muscle is with progressive overload.

This involves gradually loading the injured muscle at a safe rate to stimulate recovery and increase strength.

Try out the following exercises:

a. Passive Elevation

Instructions:

  • Lie down on your back.
  • Hold onto your wrist with your other hand.
  • Keep your arm completely relaxed.
  • Use your other arm to lift your shoulder as far as possible without causing any pain.
  • Perform 30 repetitions.

b. Wall Slide

exercises to help lift arm above shoulder

Instructions:

  • Place your hand onto the wall at shoulder height. (Start with your elbow in the bent position.)
  • Proceed to slide your hand up the wall.
  • You can provide a small amount of support at the elbow by using your other hand. (But make sure that the shoulder are you targeting is working as hard as possible.)
  • Move your shoulder as far as you are able to without causing any pain.
  • Perform 30 repetitions.

c. Active elevation

active arm elevation

Instructions:

  • Start with your elbow in the bent position.
  • Slowly reach your hand upwards as high as possible.
  • Make sure that there is no pain in the shoulder.
  • Add a 1-3 seconds hold at the top of the movement.
  • Perform 30 repetitions.

Progression:

  • Repeat exercise with a progressively straighter arm.
  • Try different hand positions
    • (Thumb pointing outwards/forwards/inwards/downwards)
  • Hold onto a light weight.

3. Sub-Acromial Impingement

Sub-Acromial Impingement (also referred to as having a Shoulder Impingement) refers to the compression of the Supraspinatus tendon and/or Sub-Acromial Bursa in the region between the acromion process and humeral head (Sub-Acromial space).

With normal shoulder mechanics – these 2 structures in the sub-acromial space will naturally get compressed (to an extent) as the arm raises above the shoulder height.

Under normal circumstances – this should not cause any issue in the shoulder.

Issues tend to arise when there is an excessive amount of inflammation/swelling/sensitivity in the area which can lead to pain when the arm is raised above a certain height.

Tests for Sub-Acromial Impingement

Here are a few ways to determine if you have this issue:

a) Get a Scan

A scan such as an ultrasound will be able to identify if the sub-acromial structures are being compressed.

(You will need to obtain a referral from your Primary Care Provider.)

b) Area of Pain

shoulder impingement area of pain

Pain is generally experienced at the tip of the shoulder.

In many cases, pain can also refer down the side of the upper arm.

c) Painful arc

painful-arc

Instructions:

  • Raise your arm out to the side and over your head. (Shoulder Abduction.)

Results: You may have Sub-Acromial Impingement if you present with the following:

  • Unable to lift arm into full range.
  • Pain between ~60-120 degrees of shoulder abduction.
  • Nil or reduced pain at early (0-60 degrees) and late (120-180 degrees) shoulder abduction.

d) Hawkins Kennedy test

test for shoulder impingement

Instructions:

  • Bend your elbow to 90 degrees.
  • Have your elbow pointing forwards.
  • Place your other hand on top of the wrist.
  • Crank your hand down as far as possible. (Shoulder Internal rotation)
  • Aim to minimize the amount of shoulder hitching as you do this.

Results: Reproduction of pain in the shoulder with the cranking movement may suggest that you have Sub-Acromial Impingement.


If you suspect that you have Sub-Acromial Impingement, check out the following points:

A. Reduce Inflammation

An excess amount of inflammation in the Sub-Acromial space may result in hyper-sensitivity and swelling in the shoulder.

Here are a few ways to address the inflammation in the shoulder:

a) Anti-Inflammatory Gel

Apply an anti-inflammatory gel to the whole shoulder.

Do this 2-3/day.

(I personally prefer products with natural active ingredients such as arnica, calendula or hypericum.)

b) Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)

It is recommended that you take a strong anti-inflammatory medication for at least 7-10 days.

(Please consult your Primary Care Provider before taking any new medication.)

c) Ice/Cold therapy

Apply an ice pack to your shoulder for at least 10-15 minutes.

Do this 3-5 times per day.

(Note: Do not apply the ice pack directly onto the skin as this can cause an ice burn.)

d) Avoid aggravating activities

Minimize exposure to any activity and/or shoulder position that aggravates the shoulder pain.

B. Shoulder Traction Stretch

shoulder traction

Instructions:

(You will need a thick resistance band for this exercise.)

  • Stand on top of the resistance band with your foot.
  • Hold onto the other end of the band with your hand.
  • Make sure that there is a firm amount of tension in the band when you are in the standing position.
  • Aim to feel the resistance band pulling your arm towards the floor.
  • Make sure to keep your shoulder as relaxed as possible.
  • Hold for 30 seconds.

C. Address the following:

The following points will help address Sub-Acromial Impingement.

(I have covered all of these points within this blog post.)

D. Read my Guide!

I have a comprehensive guide on how to fix impingement in the shoulder.

Feel free to have a look at it here:

See Post: Shoulder Impingement Exercises

I strongly recommend that you have a good read of this blog post as it covers every exercise that you will need to know to fix your Sub-Acromial Impingement (… in detail!).

4. Insufficient amount of External Rotation

Full external rotation of the shoulder joint is required to allow the arm to be raised to its full range of motion.

shoulder external rotation movement

This movement is where the upper arm bone (Humerus) rotates outwards within the shoulder socket.

How do you determine if you have limited External Rotation in the shoulder?

Perform the following test to determine this:

shoulder external rotation test

Instructions:

  • Bend your elbow to 90 degrees.
  • Point your elbow directly forwards.
  • Whilst maintaining the elbow pointing forwards, rotate your arms outwards.
  • Do not let the shoulder or torso move.
  • Take note of the forearm position.
  • Compare both sides.

Results: In my opinion – If your forearm can not pass the vertical line, this suggests that you have limited external rotation in your shoulder.

(Keep in mind – some of you may naturally have limited amount of external rotation in the shoulder. This could be due to your genetics/structure. This is why it is a good idea to compare to your unaffected side.)

To increase the amount of external rotation in the shoulder, try out these exercises.

A. Maintain the correct shoulder Blade position

… DON’T ROUND YOUR SHOULDERS FORWARDS!

This will orientate your shoulder in a sub-optimal position that may limit the amount of absolute external rotation available.

a) How to move your shoulders into a more ideal position:

shoulder position reset

Instructions:

  • Reach and stretch out your hands as far to the opposite sides as possible. (see above)
  • RetractionSlightly bring your arms backwards.
    • Feel a gentle contraction between your shoulder blades.
    • DO NOT over squeeze your shoulder blades together.
  • Posterior Tilt: Turn your palms up/back as far as you can so that your thumbs are almost pointing towards the floor.
  • Take note of your shoulder position. Keep this position! And gently lower your arms by your side.
  • Think: Keep “Wide and Long shoulders”. 

B. External Rotation with Overpressure

shoulder external rotation over pressure

Instructions:

  • Hold onto a stick with both hands.
  • Bend elbows to 90 degrees.
  • Keep elbows to the side of the torso.
  • Move your shoulder blades into the correct position. (See Previous point)
  • Guide the stick towards the side that you are trying to increase the external rotation.
  • Do not push into any pain.
  • Perform 30 repetitions.

C. Eccentric Internal Rotation

Instructions:

  • Anchor a resistance band to a stationary object at elbow height.
  • Hold onto the other end of the resistance band.
  • Stand sideways so that your target shoulder is closest to the anchor point.
  • Take a few steps away from the anchor point to increase the amount of tension on the resistance band.
  • Maintain the ideal shoulder position.
  • Allow the band to slowly pull your shoulder into as much external rotation as possible.
  • Do not allow your body to twist towards the anchor point.
  • Once you have reached the maximum external rotation, rotate the arm inwards towards the starting position.
  • Repeat 30 repetitions.

Note: Make sure that you have an appropriate amount of resistance in the band. It should be challenging.

D. Strengthen External Rotation

Instructions:

  • Lie down on your side with the shoulder being targeted on the upper side.
  • Keep your elbow on the side of your torso and elbow bent at 90 degrees throughout this exercise.
  • Rotate your arm upwards.
  • Make sure that you are not twisting your torso throughout this exercise.
  • Aim to feel a contraction of the muscles at the back of the shoulder.
  • Hold this end range position for 2 seconds.
  • Perform 30 repetitions.
  • To progress: Add resistance by holding onto an appropriate amount of weight in your hand.

E. Advanced External Rotation Stretch

Note: Be careful with this exercise as it is a more advanced stretch for the shoulder. Do NOT move into any pain.

shoulder external rotation exercise with stick

Instructions:

(You will need a long stick for this exercise.)

  • Hold onto the stick as shown above.
  • Aim to have your elbow approximately at shoulder height.
  • Keep your elbow pointing forwards throughout the exercise.
  • Using the arm at the bottom, pull the stick across the body to produce more external rotation in the other shoulder.
  • Do not move into any pain.
  • Perform 30 repetitions.

5. Limited Upward Rotation of Scapula

Upward Rotation of the Scapula involves the shoulder blade rotating outwards along the rib cage.

upward rotation of scapula during shoulder elevation

This shoulder blade movement is essential for allowing the arm to efficiently adopt a position that is above the head or shoulder.

How to determine if you have limited Upward Rotation of the scapula

Instructions:

  • Take a video from the back as you lift your arm up.
  • Observe the movement of the scapula.

Results: Ideally – you should see your shoulder blade smoothly rotate outwards as your arm is lifted up. If not – you may have limited upward rotation of the shoulder blade.

To improve the upward rotation of the scapula, you will likely need to address the control of the Serratus Anterior (and Trapezius) muscle.

Check out these exercises:

A. Serratus Anterior Activation

Instructions:

  • Assume the wall plank position. (See above)
  • Keep your shoulders long and wide.
  • Gently pull your shoulder blades backwards.
  • Activate the Serratus Anterior by pushing your forearms into the wall:
  • Feel your shoulder blades slide DOWN and AROUND the ribs.
  • Aim to feel the contraction at the side of the rib cage.
    • (… This is where the Serratus Anterior muscle is!)
  • There should be a balance between the muscles that are pulling backwards and the muscles that are pulling down/around.
  • Hold for 30 seconds.
  • Repeat 5 times.

B. Rock back

serratus anterior rock back exercise

Instructions:

  • Assume the plank position with your knees on the floor.
  • Keep your shoulders long and wide.
  • Activate the Serratus Anterior by pushing your forearms into the floor
    • Feel your shoulder blades slide DOWN and AROUND the ribs.
  • Whilst maintaining the Serratus Anterior contraction, rock your body backwards as far back as possible.
  • Make sure you can feel the Serratus Anterior engaging throughout the exercise.
  • Return to starting position.
  • Repeat 30 times.

C. Foam Roll Slide on wall

foam roller on wall exercise

Instructions:

  • Assume the plank position against the wall with a foam roller underneath the forearms.
  • Activate the Serratus Anterior by pushing your forearms into the foam roller.
  • Whilst maintaining the activation of the Serratus Anterior, slide your forearms up the wall.
    • Your shoulder blades should be rotating outwards as your arms get higher up the wall.
  • Make sure you can feel the Serratus Anterior engaging throughout the exercise.
  • Perform 30 repetitions.

6. Anterior Tilted Scapula

The anterior tilted position of the scapula is where the shoulder blade is pulled into a forward angled position on top of the rib cage.

It is commonly seen in people Rounded Shoulders.

effect of scapula anterior tilt

This shoulder blade position can block the normal movement of the shoulder as the arm is lifted.

Ideally – The shoulder blade should tilt backwards slightly as the arm is lifted above the shoulder height.

How do I know if my scapula is anteriorly tilted?

anterior tilt scapula

Instructions:

  • Take a photo of your side profile.
  • Observe the angle of your shoulder blade.
  • Is it tilting forwards?

Results: If you can observe a forward tilt in the region of the scapula, this suggests that you have an anterior tilt in the scapula.

If this is an issue for you, the following exercises will help you address it:

A. Pec Minor Release

Target area:

pec minor release

Instructions:

  • Lie down on your stomach.
  • Place a massage ball underneath the chest.
  • Apply an appropriate amount of pressure on top of the ball.
  • Make sure to cover the entire length of the muscle.
  • Continue for 1 minute.

b. Pec Minor Stretch

pec minor stretch

Instructions:

  • Place your palm and forearm high up onto a door frame.
  • Tilt your shoulder backwards throughout this stretch.
  • Keep your lower ribs down to prevent the lower back from arching.
  • Lunge forwards.
  • Aim to feel a stretch in the chest region.
  • Hold for 30 seconds.

Note: With limited shoulder mobility, you may need to place your arm in a lower position on the wall.

C. Levator Scapulae/Upper Trapezius Release

Target area:

upper trap release ball

Instructions:

  • Locate the target muscles:
    • Upper Trapezius
    • Levator scapulae
  • Place a massage ball between these muscles and a wall. (see above)
  • Apply an appropriate amount of pressure into the ball.
  • Make sure to cover the entire muscle.
  • Continue for 1 minute.

d. Posterior tilt Exercise

This exercise will help tilt the scapula into a more ideal position to allow the arm to be lifted above the shoulder.

It mainly targets the lower trapezius, serratus anterior and triceps muscle.

posterior tilt scapula

Instructions:

  • Maintain wide and long shoulders.
  • Perform Scapular Posterior tilt:
    • “Rotate the shoulder blade BACKWARDS.”
    • Imagine the bottom of your shoulder blade digging into your ribs.
  • Aim to FEEL the muscles contract at the base of the scapula.
  • Hold for 5 seconds.
  • Repeat 20 times.

7. Hunchback Posture

The Hunchback Posture is where the upper back is slouching forwards.

It is also referred to as having a Thoracic Hyperkyphosis.

hunchback posture

In this position, the shoulder blades are orientated in the anterior tilted position which can block the arm from lifting above the shoulder height.

It may also predispose one to developing issues associated with Sub-Acromial Impingement and Rotator Cuff tendinopathies. (as previously discussed in points 2 and 3)

Test for Hunchback Posture:

hunchback posture test

Instructions:

  • Stand up with your back against a wall.
  • Have your feet slightly away from the wall.
  • Aim to have your whole spine flat against the wall.
  • Do not over arch your lower back.
  • Can you keep your spine and the back of your head in contact with the wall?

Results: If you are unable to keep your spine and back of head in contact with the wall, then it is likely that you have Hunchback Posture.

(Note: If the back of your head does not come in contact with the wall, this may also suggest that you have a Forward Head Posture.)

If you have a hunched upper back, try out these exercises:

A. Upper back Decompression

upper back decompression

Instructions:

  • Sit down on chair.
  • Nod your chin down towards the upper chest.
  • Place your hands behind your head and pull your head down.
  • Proceed to round the upper back as much as possible.
  • Aim to feel a stretch at the back between the shoulder blades.
  • Take deep breaths into the area of stretch.
  • Hold for 30 seconds.

B. Thoracic Extension

thoracic spine extension foam roller

Instructions:

  • Lie down on your back.
  • Place a foam roller underneath the upper back region where the spine curves forwards.
  • Support the back of your head with your hands.
  • Dig your heels into the ground and place more pressure into the foam roller.
  • Slowly arch backwards at the point of contact with the foam roller.
  • Keep your lower ribs down to prevent over arching of the lower back.
  • Remember – you should only be moving over a very small amplitude.
  • Oscillate in this motion for 30 repetitions.
  • Place the foam roller slightly higher/lower and repeat.

C. Be aware of your posture

Throughout the day – it is important to monitor and correct your posture.

Are you sitting with good posture when you are watching television, driving, using the computer etc.?

Over time – Habitual slouching will make it very difficult to address the Hunchback Posture.

D. Read this blog post

If you have a Hunchback Posture, I suggest that you check out my complete guide on how to address this problem:

See post: Exercises for Hunchback Posture

This blog post covers every single exercise that you will ever need to know. Check it out now!

8. Pinched Nerve in Neck

Compression of certain nerves in the neck can lead to a decreased ability to raise the arm.

pinched nerve in neck

This is because compressed nerves have an impaired ability to transmit the electrical signal to cause the muscular contraction required to lift the shoulder up.

How to tell if you have a pinched nerve

a) Get A Scan

A MRI scan to the Cervical spine (neck) can be used to determine if there are structural abnormalities pressing onto a nerve.

b) Symptoms of a pinched nerve in the neck

There will be neurological symptoms in the arm such as:

  • Pain referring down arm
  • Tingling
  • Numbness
  • Altered reflexes
  • Shooting/burning pain
  • Weakness
  • Muscle wasting

Here are some exercises to decompress the nerve:

A. Decompress side of neck

lateral flexion neck stretch

Instructions:

  • Look slightly downwards.
  • Tilt your head AWAY from the side of the nerve impingement.
  • Place your hand on the side of your head and apply a downwards pressure.
  • Whilst holding this position, rotate your head slightly towards the side of the pinched nerve.
  • Aim to feel a prominent stretch on the side of your neck.
  • Avoid any pinching sensation on the side that you are pulling your head towards.
  • Hold for 30 seconds.
  • Repeat 3 times.

Note: Do NOT perform this stretch whilst pulling your head towards the side of impingement as this may potentially compress the nerve.

B. neck traction

neck traction

Instructions:

  • Tie a resistance band to a stationary object. (Height: ~3-4 feet)
  • Lie on the floor with your knees bent.
  • Wrap the band under the base of the skull.
  • Whilst still holding the band with your hands, slowly shuffle your body away from the anchor point.
  • Slowly let go and let the band pull on your head.
  • Move as far away until you can feel a stretch at the back of your neck.
  • Completely relax.
  • Hold for 30-60 seconds.

Note: Place a small towel between the head and the band to prevent your hair from being pulled.

C. Maintain correct head position

forward head posture

If you have a Forward Head Posture and/or your head is tilted towards one side, this can lead to compression of the nerve.

Aim to keep your head in a more neutral position.

D. Read this blog post

If you would like to see the best exercises to address a pinched nerve in the neck, feel free to check out my comprehensive guide:

See Post: Exercise for a Pinched Nerved in the Neck

9. Frozen Shoulder

Frozen Shoulder is a condition that is characterized by marked stiffness around the shoulder capsule.

It is also referred to as Adhesive Capsulitis.

a) How do I know if I have a Frozen Shoulder?

Multi-Directional Restriction: If you have significant restrictions in all of your shoulder movements (especially with External rotation, Elevation, Hand Behind Back position), this suggests that you may have a Frozen Shoulder.

b) How long does is take to fix?

Typically – it can take up to 1-2 years to completely resolve by itself.

In my opinion – the shoulder will tend to improve quicker and more effectively by performing the appropriate shoulder exercises.

Here are some options to address your Frozen Shoulder:

A. Keep your shoulder moving!

It is important to keep your shoulder moving as much as you can comfortably tolerate.

Failure to do this can predispose your shoulder to getting even tighter in the long term.

Here is a simple exercise to get your shoulder moving:

a) Passive Shoulder Elevation

passive shoulder elevation

Instructions:

  • Lie down on your back.
  • Hold onto your wrist with your other hand.
  • Keep your arm completely relaxed.
  • Use your other arm to lift your shoulder as far as possible without causing any pain.
  • Perform 30 repetitions.

B. Hydro-Dilatation

This involves injecting saline solution via a needle into the joint capsule to help stretch the capsule from the inside.

It is usually administered along side a corticosteroid (to reduce inflammation) and a local anesthetic (to numb pain).

You will need to ask your Primary Care Provider for more information regarding this treatment to see if this procedure is appropriate in your situation.

C. See a Healthcare Professional

If you do not have any experience in dealing with a Frozen Shoulder, I would strongly recommend that you seek close guidance from a healthcare professional.

They will be able to accurately assess your shoulder and prescribe you with the best personalized strategy to holistically address the Frozen Shoulder.

(I will likely write a blog post on this topic in the future. Let me know in the comment section if this is something that you would be interested in.)

10. Other issues

Other shoulder injuries may also prevent the arm from being raised without pain.

  • AC joint pathology
  • Arthritis
  • Labral issues
  • Surgery to the shoulder

Please seek guidance from a healthcare professional if you have these of these injuries to the shoulder.


Conclusion

If you can’t lift your arm above the shoulder without pain, please consider the recommended suggestions on this blog post.

If you are anything like the patients that I see with this issue, I strongly suspect that many of you will need to address more than 1 factor to get your shoulder moving better again.

Persist with the exercises! Be consistent.

If all else fails, please seek professional guidance from a healthcare provider.


What to do next

1. Any questions?… (Leave me a comment down below.)

2. Come join me:

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3. Start doing the exercises!


Disclaimer: The content presented on this blog post is not medical advice and should not be treated as such. It is not intended to be used as a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis or treatment. Use of the content provided on this blog post is at your sole risk. For more informationMedical Disclaimer.

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